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Steven M. Denenberg, M.D.
Steven M. Denenberg, M.D.
rhinoplasty
 
Views of this rhinoplasty patient:

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On this view, too, the dorsum is a straight line, and the tip sticks out ever so slightly beyond that line.  Most people feel that is a good relationship between tip and dorsum.

For more on tip definition, visit our rhinoplasty tutorial's chapter on defining and creating tip definition (the surgery tutorials contain explicit photographs taken during surgery).


next view of this patient

"...he exceeded my expectations while still
making my nose extremely natural looking. "
See all of Dr. Denenberg's reviews on

 

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All views of this rhinoplasty patient:
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current: Left oblique
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Go here to learn how to send your photos to Dr. Denenberg,
or to arrange a personal consultation.


Next: an example of the solid advice Dr. Denenberg gives patients on RealSelf.com.
Get that advice for your own situation by emailing your photos to Dr. Denenberg.

Questioner: Is my nose tip broken?
As a child I had a bad fall on my nose. Ever since it has gradually got worse over the years. I have trouble breathing from my left nostril and I have a poor sense of smell. I can feel a split at the front of the tip. Also if I squeeze my nose tip it feels springy. I'm not sure if this is related, but I suffer with nose bleeds alot too
(Questioner submitted photos)

Dr. Denenberg's answer: Your nose isn't broken, but you must be very careful in selecting a surgeon.
The split and the springiness and the size of your tip are all related to the fact that the two cartilages that form the tip of your nose are fairly large and asymmetric. Your skin is thin, so it's easy to see, and even feel, the contour of those cartilages under the skin.

This all means that if you decide to have a rhinoplasty, you must be very, very careful about selecting the right surgeon. The vast majority of rhinoplasty surgeons do not have the skill and expertise to handle your tip cartilages, which cartilages pose a significant technical challenge.

When evaluating surgeons, you must insist on seeing before and after photos of their other patients. Look to see whether the doctor has been able to handle large tips like yours. If the photos only show profile views, like shaving off a hump, that's not good enough evidence for your situation. Generally, the three-quarter views show the tip cartilages best.

Link to this question on RealSelf.com



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