• Rhinoplasty
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Steven M. Denenberg, M.D.
Steven M. Denenberg, M.D.
rhinoplasty
 
Views of this rhinoplasty patient:

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The oblique views that are more darkly lit are the best views in which to see the strength of the cartilages that form the tip of her nose.  The more rounded those cartilages are, and the thinner the skin that covers the tip, the more we are able to see the outline and the curves of the strong cartilages.

The surgery on those tip cartilages is also what allows the tip of the nose to elevate, shortening the nose, and to move back toward the face.


next view of this patient

"He is very kind and honest and
made me feel confortable from the first moment. "
See all of Dr. Denenberg's reviews on

 

Interested in morphs?
All views of this rhinoplasty patient:
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rhinoplasty
rhinoplasty
current: Right oblique
rhinoplasty
rhinoplasty
rhinoplasty
rhinoplasty
rhinoplasty

Go here to learn how to send your photos to Dr. Denenberg,
or to arrange a personal consultation.


Next: an example of the solid advice Dr. Denenberg gives patients on RealSelf.com.
Get that advice for your own situation by emailing your photos to Dr. Denenberg.

Questioner: Is There Any Kind of Procedure for my Kind of Nose?
Theres a bit of cartilage at the base of my nose under my top lip which makes my nose and my profile longer (pic 1&3) Can anything be done about this? I think its because of this cartilage which runs from the columella to my bone which cause my nose to be pinocchio-esque. The Nasofrontal Angle is rather small around 100 degrees and in (2) you can see that the alar base is not in-line with columella base, its rather lower. From the front this makes my nostrils more pronounced (4).
(Questioner submitted photos)

Dr. Denenberg's answer: Your nose mainly requires deprojection, bringing the tip back closer to the face
You have a strongly projecting tip, and otherwise many attractive features to your nose. Respectfully, I don't think it's the bone at the base of the nose that makes the tip projecting -- that bone is only rarely the culprit. It's almost always the length and strength of the lateral crura of the tip cartilages that provide the support and strength to overproject the tip. I made a morph to show what your nose can look like after surgery. You need a surgeon who can prove to you that he is expert in deprojecting noses; many, if not most, of the revisions that I perform relate to deprojecting noses that were inadequately projected during the primary operation.

Link to this question on RealSelf.com



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